From Visible to Invisible in Art

Long time ago, a close friend showed me a little picture at  the Prado Museum. “The Death Crist supported  by an Angel “ An angel whose emotion is difficult to express with words The table has been part of the collections of the  Prado Museum  since 1965 and is currently exhibited in the magnificent temporary exhibition “A place of memory 1819-2019” Antonello da Messina is probably the most important Renaissance painter in southern Italy, known for his early mastery of the Flemish technique in oil painting (Giorgio Vasari  at his book “ The lives of the most excellent painters…” thought

Sorolla Museum by Alicia Fornery

There are few places in the world where you can enjoy works by artists of the first order uncrowded and quietly. The Sorolla Museum is one of those places. Walking through its elegant garden inspired by the Andalusian gardens of Granada, Cordoba and Seville, time stops for a moment just before starting to recede until the early twentieth century, when it was built as a main residence of the painter and his family at Madrid. Once inside, something happens. It’s lighter indoors than outside … it’s the bright and crispy light of Valencian beaches, of the white that contains every

Master of Candlelight & Shadows

Born in France in 1593 George de la Tour early artistic career is somewhat of a mystery but it is documented that at the age of 27 he petitioned to the Duke of Lorraine to move to wife’s nearby hometown of Luneville and work there as a professional artist.He was granted permission and set up as a master painter with a studio and apprentice. La Tour became a successful provincial artist, painting mainly religious scenes.He became recognised for his nocturne paintings, where night scene narratives were dramatically lit as if by the light of a candle. The Duke of Lorraine

THE FAUVES

The Fauves. Passion For Color, journeys through the génesis and decelopment of Fauvism, controversial and exuberant movement thet entailed a renewing challenge towards the art of its time. The exibition offers an overview of the first major avant-garde artistic movement of the 20th century. The fauves, led by Henri Matisse, André Derain and Maurice de Vlaminck, really shook up the art establishment of their day with their innovative approach to the use of color, their energetic brushwork and seemingly wild execution. In 1905, their works were exhibited in the Salon d’Automne, causing such a stir among the public and the

Around the work of great master of the Neoclassical line, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres.

The Prado Museum  current exhibition gives a close look at the technique of one of the most revered artists in the history of drawing and provides an occasion to learn from his example. The exhibition presents itself touches on his complex relationship with the art of portraiture, (the sacred art which has secured his place as one of the great painters of history), torn between ambition and repulsion. The works of Ingres and his very individual aesthetic represent a key movement towards the artistic revolutions of the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. He